Choosing a Puppy or an Adult Dog

Are you planning on welcoming a new dog into your home? If so, one of the biggest decisions you will have to make is based on age, specifically if you want a puppy or an adult dog. Both are equally as lovable and adorable, but they differ in how they will fit into your life. Consider a few things when making your decision.

dog adoption

Think about the role you want to play in their life. You’ll help mold a puppy’s personality from day one and teach them virtually everything they know. This isn’t the case with an adult, not to say you won’t have an impact on their life. If you are willing to go through the developmental stages of a dog’s life, like teething and potty training, then possibly a puppy is right for you.

You will also want to consider how much time you have on your hands. Puppies require a lot of attention and someone to spend a lot of time with them. Dogs with a few years behind them often need less supervision and provide more flexibility for owners. Think about your work schedule and how much time you have to dedicate to an animal. Training a pup can sometimes be a full-time job in itself, while an adult will develop a routine much quicker.

You should factor in the costs of adopting or purchasing. Buying a purebred puppy usually costs hundreds of dollars more than an adult or a rescue. Raising a dog obviously has a cost too, and you should figure out if your budget can support a four-legged friend.

In the end, a dog needs to fit in with you and your lifestyle. If you have a baby or young child, you may want to hold off on getting any kind of dog. If you have older children or don’t have kids then it might be the right time. For more on this subject visit: Pet Finder.

Photo courtesy of: Angela N.

Spring Cleaning for Dog Owners

It’s finally spring! So as we put out our patio furniture and clean out the garage, let’s not forget about our four-legged friends. Whether it’s cleaning up their hair or prepping them to spend more time outside, there are several things you can do to make it easier on you and your pup.

cleveland dogs

First, let’s get your dog cleaned up. A quick outside bath will have your dog smelling fresh and won’t leave a mess indoors. Be cautious of dry skin by not bathing them too long or too often. Brushing out their coat first will also help. Wiping him or her down with a towel sprayed with half apple cider vinegar and half water, followed by sprinkling baking soda on their body will remove any odor. After brushing, you’re dog will be smelling great!

Next up is your home. You will want to use rubber gloves to remove hair from furniture and other fabrics. Sweeping areas with a slightly damp glove will help ball up hair and make it easier to pick up. It’s also a good idea to wash any toys they use often. Depending on the make, either throw the toys in the washer or wash them by hand. Finally, neutralizing all odors from carpets will keep your dog from going the bathroom inside. You can use online resources or ask your vet if you want specific steps on how to do so.

In our opinion, spring cleaning isn’t so bad with a clean dog by your side. We hope they enjoy baths!

If you are a dog owner and want more spring cleaning tips visit: Cesars Way

Dog Parks: Is Your Dog Ready?

Can you believe spring is just about a week away? Well, we are hoping that means warmer temperatures in Cleveland, which in turn will allow us to play outside with the dogs more often. While we have plenty of room at DogTropolis, I know that is not always true for dog owners that live in apartments or with little to no yard. That’s where dog parks come in.

cleveland dog park

Yes, dog parks can be a great place to go for you and your dog, but there are a few things you need to know before you venture out. The good thing for you is you already have a head start on the first step, which is to get on your computer or tablet and research local parks. See what other dog owners have said and check how much space is available. A little background information is never a bad thing.

You will also want to think hard about whether your four-legged friend is meant for a dog park. Consider their age, size and how they interact with other dogs. All of those things often come into play. You do not want to take your dog if he or she is too aggressive. Same goes for if they are too shy. Above all, parks are a social environment for dogs to interact with other dogs, as well as humans. You know your dog best, and trust that you know whether they are ready for this type of environment.

Whether it is at dog park or not, we hope you spend some time outside with your canine this year. In Northeast Ohio, we have to take advantage of the beautiful weather when we can. 

Go to APDT if you would like to know about the advantages and disadvantages of dogs parks.

Photo courtesy of Don DeBold.

Finding the Right Dog Trainer

Choosing a dog trainer can be one of the most important decisions you have to make as an owner. The methods a given trainer chooses to use can impact your dog’s life for years down the road. Therefore, you should take the time to find the right trainer.

dog trainer cleveland

First of all, you will need research. This will help you better understand all the options available to you. Trainers vary in the types of technique and equipment they use. While it’s ultimately your decision, we recommend a trainer that uses positive reinforcement and not fear based tactics. As a personal recommendation for Cleveland area dog owners, DogTropolis suggests Cold Nose Companions. Asking for recommendations from trusted family and friends is a great idea, as well.

After narrowing down your search, you will next want to schedule an appointment to speak with a trainer and get an overall feel for their work environment. We recommend you don’t bring your dog the first time. Looking for obvious signs like cleanliness and organization will go a long way. In this visit, do not be afraid to ask questions about topics such as their education and background in the field. Most trainers love when their clients take particular interest in the care for their dog.

Finally, take your dog to a chosen trainer. See how they interact with your dog and how invested they are. With time, they will develop a relationship with you and your dog. Open communication is often the key to finding the right trainer, and ultimately seeing progress with your four-legged friend.

To find certified dog training professionals in your area go to: CCPDT

Photo courtesy of: State Farm